Stars and planets

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Summary

There are many types of stars and planets, each of which has their own advantage, and disadvantages in terms of gameplay value. This page is dedicated to categorize all astronomical objects and phenomena, and describe them.

When picking a star to construct a dyson sphere around, it's highly recommended to do it around a star with the highest luminosity (L), as many stars can have more than double (~2 L) if not triple (~3 L) the energy output than the starter system's star (~1 L), which is much less time consuming, and more effective than building one or even two additional dyson spheres orbiting neighboring stars.

Some rare veins and ores can only be found on certain types of planets, but on the other hand, it can also be impossible for those materials to naturally occur in other planets.

Types of planets

According to this reddit post, all terrestrial planets appear to follow the same grid layout:

    5x20 (Including the pole, forms a 9 diameter disk around the pole)
    5x40
    5x80
    5x100
    10x160
    10x200
    15x300
    15x400
    25x500
    25x600
    50x800
    80x1000
    Equator (1x1000)
    

When building on a seam between the different bands, buildings will snap to the band closest to the equator.

Name Description Image Surface view
Mediterranean Lush, tropical, and covered with oceans, they're abundant with basic resources. There is only one of these planet types in the cluster. It is the player's starter home planet. They're also a great source of crude oil.
Ashen gelisol Similar to a Gobi desert planet, but this time a frozen one. Veins of fire ice can be found around such planets.
Arid desert Another desert planet, but compared to others, these planets are a great source for capturing wind energy.
Barren desert Similar to the moon, its surface is covered with craters, since there's no atmosphere, wind turbines are useless, there are no oceans either, but it has the biggest construction area, and can be a decent source for soil piles. Veins of fire ice can be found around such planets.
Gobi Another planet fully devoid of any life or water, but does contain mountains, so they're a great source for soil piles.
Hurricane Stone Forest
Ice field gelisol Planets covered with ice, and may have pockets of water scattered around the surface, veins of fire ice can be found around such planets. Since they're usually far away from their orbiting star, and have weak winds, they're terrible sources for renewable energy, the use of thermal power stations is recommended.  
Lava Inhospitable, covered with lava lakes, they usually contain silicon ore and titanium ore.
Oceanic jungle Similar to Mediterranean and Prairie planets, they're lush planets, and they commonly contain sources of spiniform stalagmite crystals, crude oil, and organic crystals.
Prairie Similar to mediterranean planets, they're habitable lush oceanic planets, has less oceans, and more grasslands. They're also a good source of crude oil. Organic crystal veins can also be found there.
Red stone Similar to Mediterranean planets, but the soil is more reddish, and the surface is covered with mushrooms.
Rocky Salt Lake
Sakura Ocean Similar to Oceanic jungle. Rich with crude oil and coal, this lush and colorful planet features organic crystal and most common ores.
Scarlet Ice Lake
Volcanic Ash Similar to a lava planet, it's devoid of anything but volcanic activity, however, these planets are also a great source of sulfuric acid, and oceans of such are found around such planets.
Waterworld Waterworlds are almost entirely covered with oceans and constructing any large infrastructure on their surfaces will be resource and time intensive. They are also a source of spiniform stalagmite crystals which may offset those constraints for some players. It is highly recommended to bring an abundance foundations and of soil piles when setting out to set up an Ocean World mining outpost.
Gas Giant Gas Giants are commonly found around the universe, and are a good source of Deuterium and Hydrogen by using Orbital Collectors.
Ice Giant Ice Giants are less commonly found around the universe, but are a good source of Fire Ice and Hydrogen by using Orbital Collectors.

Stellar objects

Class Image Description
Class M star   The lowest mass stars are commonly referred to as Red Dwarf stars. They are the most abundant class of star, however, their luminosity is very low, making it very impractical to construct Dyson Spheres or even Dyson Swarms around them.
Class K star   A low mass star, they typically have a luminosity of < 1 L, making them poor sites for construction of Dyson Spheres. Dyson Swarms may however still be of some use with their much lower resource requirements.
Class G star   This is the class of star of which the Sun is a standard member. They typically have a luminosity of ~1 L. While they can make good use of Dyson Spheres and Dyson Swarms, higher luminosity stars may be a better location for Dyson Sphere construction.

The starting system is always around a class G star.

Class F star   These stars have a higher luminosity while being of similar size to Class G stars. This makes them better sites for construction of Dyson Spheres, should no Class A or above stars be nearby.
Class A star   This class have fairly high luminosity, while not being particularly large. This makes them good sites for construction of Dyson Spheres if materials are more limited, or there are no nearby Class B or O stars.
Class B star   This class have a high luminosity, while not being as large as Class O. This makes them excellent sites for construction of Dyson Spheres if materials are more limited.
Class O star   The brightest star type, ideal for constructing Dyson Spheres around them. However, they also tend to be the largest, and so require more materials to do so.
Giant star   Can be of any spectral class that main sequence stars belong to. Giants are >10R⊙ (with exceptions) and have higher luminosity than their main sequence counterparts. Depending on spectral class, they are referred to as Red, Yellow, White and Blue giants. M-class Red giants and B-class Blue giants are the most common giant stars in the universe, while Yellow and White giants are extremely rare.
White Dwarf   A stellar remnant following a nova, composed of electron-degenerate matter. Low luminosity makes them poor sites for construction of Dyson Spheres. Dyson Swarms may however still be of some use with their much lower resource requirements.

Non-giant planets orbiting White Dwarves are guaranteed to have veins of Fractal Silicon, Kimberlite Ore and Optical Grating Crystal.

Neutron Star   A stellar remnant following a supernova, composed of neutrons with a shell of electron-degenerate matter. Low luminosity makes them poor sites for construction of Dyson Spheres. Dyson Swarms may however still be of some use with their much lower resource requirements.

It is one of the rarest stars, only one will be generated in a cluster.

Unipolar Magnets can only be found on host planets orbiting a Neuton Star or Black Hole.

Black Hole   A massive stellar remnant following a supernova, it has collapsed behind an event horizon. Usually surrounded by an accretion disc. Their extremely low luminosity makes construction of Dyson Spheres or Dyson Swarms a vanity project, as they will produce little power.

It is one of the rarest stars, only one will be generated in a cluster.

Unipolar Magnets can only be found on host planets orbiting a Neuton Star or Black Hole.

Sources of rare veins

List of where you might find rare veins, please note that the starter planet is an exemption of this list.
Commonly found on habitable planets (Oceanic Jungle, Red Stone, Prairie and Sakura Ocean planets).
Commonly found on Ice Field Gelisol and Scarlet Ice Lake planets and Ice Giants. Also occurs on Ashen Gelisol and Barren Desert planets.
Commonly found on habitable and oceanic planets (Mediterranean, Oceanic Jungle, Red Stone, Prairie, Sakura Ocean and Waterworld planets).
Commonly found on Waterworld planets, also occurs on habitable planets (Oceanic Jungle, Red Mushroom, Prairie and Sakura Ocean).
Only found on Volcanic Ash planets.
Commonly found on desert planets (Arid Desert, Barren Desert, Gobi, Hurricane Stone Forest, Rocky Salt Lake), Lava, Red Stone and Scarlet Ice Lake planets. Guaranteed to spawn on planets orbiting White Dwarves.
Commonly found on freezing planets (Ashen Gelisol, Ice Field Gelisol), some deserts (Gobi, Hurricane Stone Forest, Rocky Salt Lake) and Lava planets. Guaranteed to spawn on planets orbiting White Dwarves.
Only found on planets orbiting Neutron Stars or Black Holes.
Commonly found in deserts (Gobi, Hurricane Stone Forest, Rocky Salt Lake), Lava and freezing planets (Ice Field Gelisol, Scarlet Ice Lake). Guaranteed to spawn on planets orbiting White Dwarves.
Only found on Gas Giants.

State of stellar objects

Planets can have multiple physical attributes and states, which are listed below.

Name Description Image
Tidal locking (TL) Planets that has the same rotational period as orbital period, and consequently has one side permanently facing its host star or planet. Very useful to capture the host star's energy via solar panels and/or ray receivers
Sattelite (SAT) Astronomical objects that orbit another object that isn't a star, or in simpler terms, a moon. The starter planet is one example of such object. However, building EM-rail ejectors would be problematic, as the orbiting parent can block the sun, rendering them useless until the orbiting object passes, this decreases the time the EM-rail ejectors can fire sails, and decreases their effeciency.
Reverse Rotation (RR) The astronomical object in question rotates in the reverse direction, or clockwise when viewed from one of the poles.
Horizontal Rotation (HR) The planet has an axial inclination close to 90° causing it to rotatate around a horizontal axis when viewed from the stellar poles. Still experiences seasons.
Orbital Resonance (OR) The planet has longer days. Orbital resonance 1:2 would mean a cycle of two days per year and 1:4 four days per year. Orbital resonance of 1:1 would be tidal locked.